Pipilotti Rist

Rist is an international artist who makes video installations and multimedia works. Pipilotti Rist was born in 1962 in Grabs, Switzerland. She has studied graphic design, illustration, and photography at the Institute of Applied Arts in Vienna, and also audiovisual communications and video at the School of Design in Basel. Rist currently resides in LA and Zurich, Switzerland. She uses a spirited attitude in a provocative manner to explore female sexuality in her digital art, with the combination of the unreal and average. She can be identified as an artist for the Feminist movement because of the way she used body in her work to create an intense message but still has a sensual aura.

I like how simple her works appear but again the message that is behind them makes that simplicity focus on the message she is trying to convey. The large scale of her projects also demands attention from the viewers, as her installations and pieces can take up the entire wall of a gallery. The video still of How Many Steps is really appealing to me because of the bright colors and the size of the work. However, I think there is a great message that can be added to the feminist movement here because the viewer because they are standing at their feet. Meaning that the woman is being placed above anyone and people must look up to her and I think being at the foot highlights this even more. Her piece Do Not Abandon Me is really interesting to me because she is the one in the photograph and it is such a change from the “pop punk” feel of her other works that I have seen. It seems very 50s with being put together, duller use of color, and the setting. I also feel this way with Pixel Forest because of the use of bright colors and feminine feel, while juxtaposing nature to technology.

http://235bowery.s3.amazonaws.com/events/835/thumbnails/565x565x1.jpg
http://235bowery.s3.amazonaws.com/events/835/thumbnails/565x565x1.jpg
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/15/magazine/15rist-t.html?_r=0
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/15/magazine/15rist-t.html?_r=0
http://www.luhringaugustine.com/artists/pipilotti-rist/artworks/photos-and-videostills?view=slider#3
http://www.luhringaugustine.com/artists/pipilotti-rist/artworks/photos-and-videostills?view=slider#3

 

Jason Salavon

Salavon was born in Indiana and currently is working out of Chicago. He received his MFA at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and his BA from The University of Texas at Austin. He uses software that he creates on his own to change perspective on familiar things and juxtaposes multiple ideas and themes, such as the individual versus a group. The end results are prints, video installations, and a few real-time software contexts. Salavon’s work reminded me of Cory Arcangel because of how he did his work and how he approaches/creates his works.

The piece, The Master Index, was really interesting to me because he highlights the theme of the individual versus the group, as he highlights so many things that people look up on the internet individually and he makes this list a collection of a group. I also like how this looks at popular culture and how people now can look things up so quickly with technology. I am also curious why he picked Wikipedia to look at, since it is referred as the most unreliable source and if that is one of the reasons it picked that look out culture. I thought I good representation of his theme of the individual versus a group was in The Class of 1988 series because he has yearbook pictures lined up but the faces of the individual are blurred out. I like this picture a lot because it is apparent that these are senior yearbook pictures and this was such a defining moment for both the individual and the graduating class overall but they are blurred out. It is such a simple tool to use but it makes are large statement and reminds me of the One Tool project that we did and how impressing and satisfying the work was.

http://www.salavon.com/work/Class/
http://www.salavon.com/work/Class/
http://www.salavon.com/site_media/projects/tmi/tiles_numerical/9/3-0.jpg
http://www.salavon.com/site_media/projects/tmi/tiles_numerical/9/3-0.jpg
http://www.salavon.com/work/tmi/#
http://www.salavon.com/work/tmi/#

Kelli Connell

Kelli Connell grew up in Texas in a small conservative town. Connell creates images from scanning and manipulating negative images in Photoshop. The photos look as though she took them, but the event in them never happened. This interests me because I think it can represent the human mind and what is imagined. I think it can psychologically make the viewer question reality and what is created when they understand how she creates her pieces. I appreciate her questioning gender and sexuality in her pieces, and again I think her medium heightens this appreciation for me because I think it adds to the narrative because they are fabricated realities that question two important social constructs.

I really appreciate how real her images appear to be and if I didn’t know about her work I would assume it was a just a really well done photograph. I could see more of the adding in she did with Drying Off, where as in Haircut or Getting Up I couldn’t fathom that the images were merged together. I find these more difficult to analyze compared to all the pieces and artist we have looked at this semester because they appear so real, that I feel like Connell is implying one specific message and theme into her pictures because there is such unity.

http://kelliconnell.com/getting-up/
http://kelliconnell.com/getting-up/
http://kelliconnell.com/windowsill/
http://kelliconnell.com/windowsill/
http://kelliconnell.com/hair-cut/
http://kelliconnell.com/hair-cut/
http://kelliconnell.com/drying-off/
http://kelliconnell.com/drying-off/

Sanner fun

scanner-dress-blog

Representational: “Enjoy”

Materials used:Rose petals, wine cork, foundation, sugar, glitter, water, salt

galaxy-scan

Non-representational:”Galaxy go”

Materials used: acrylic paint, a plastic bag, egg yolk and shell, a lollipop, a rose petal, paprika, powdered coffee creamer, glitter

Photoshop tools: smudge, blur, brightness/contrast,exposure, vibrance, hue/saturation, sharpen

Christian Marclay

Marclay was born in California and brought up in Switzerland, while currently living in London. He began his work with audio and music while a student with turntables. He works with audio, to transform sound into a visible form to be analyzed through performance, collage, sculpture, installation, photography, and videos. He has been described as a Dadaist DJ and filmmaker for his provocative pieces of work. I appreciate how he analyzes things that are not tangible, such as sound, because when looking at pieces of things that do not exist I feel like the viewer may experience a new type of art.

In The Clock, Marclay is examining time, and more specifically timing in movies. It is one of his more recent pieces of work that has thousands of fragments from movies that have been edited to make a 24 hour video. Viewers can look at the piece of work and use it to tell time, while viewers are also experiencing so much that time loses it self. I think is really interesting that he was able to “manipulate time” and personalize time, since in everyday life people often personalize time without even knowing it but Marclay makes it obvious in this piece of work. I was also very intrigued by Record Without a Cover because of the concept and purpose Marclay wanted the record to have. He sold a record without a cover or sleeve to protect it, so after pay the record would keep breaking down to manipulate the sounds. I was also really interested, yet slightly confused by his Crossfire exhibit. The video installation was fascinating because Marclay analyzes sound on modern issues, such as guns and violence. However I was more interested in the prints from this exhibition that were pieces from comic books that had sounds words, yet some pieces of the prints were missing. I think this is because he wanted people to focus on the sound and maybe analyze the tone of the word without the context from the plot of the comic.

http://whitecube.com/exhibitions/christian_marclay_crossfire_hoxton_square_2007/
http://whitecube.com/exhibitions/christian_marclay_crossfire_hoxton_square_2007/
http://whitecube.com/exhibitions/christian_marclay_crossfire_hoxton_square_2007/
http://whitecube.com/exhibitions/christian_marclay_crossfire_hoxton_square_2007/
http://e.snmc.io/lk/f/l/a76434355bbada2a4082556655ea12f2/2186084.jpg
http://e.snmc.io/lk/f/l/a76434355bbada2a4082556655ea12f2/2186084.jpg
http://whitecube.com/artists/christian_marclay/
http://whitecube.com/artists/christian_marclay/

Wafaa Bilal

Bilal was born in Iraq, where he had to flee, and currently teaches at NYU’s Tisch Art School. He is known best for work that raises questions about international relations and international dynamics in the world. He allows the viewers of his pieces to see different political situations from a different point of view, which then stimulates conversation and reduces reductionist thinking that many people have by becoming desensitized to war culture. He is trying to remove this bias by expose harsh truths that many people would like to consciously stay oblivious to.

As an international affairs major I really connected and appreciated these pieces, because it gave me a different perspective on things I learn in the classroom. It allows you to see what will soon be history from a different point of view, as history is often centered around bias while being constructed by the winner like a propaganda piece. The Ashes Series I really enjoyed because he is exposing the aftermath of the War on Terror, which people do not like to think about because talking about murder and the outcomes on the opposing group. War has become dehumanized by the increasing use of machinery and the decreasing amount of people involved. He removed the people from the picture, which I liked a lot because it highlights the aftermath and how war affects people. The dust laying on the ground was also very ominous, because there could be a parallel of human ashes and the destructive dust from war, such as drone strikes. The And Counting series is also very impressive to me because it enhance his connects to his work and his intense personal connection, in my opinion, makes the work even greater. The Iraq/Iran gif was also very intriguing to me because just the last letter changes, which make me, think Bilal is trying to highlight that society often merges the two together. On his website I read that the color green is also significant four the two countries and that is one reason why he chose it.

http://wafaabilal.com/iraqiran/
http://wafaabilal.com/iraqiran/
http://wafaabilal.com/and-counting/#&panel1-1
http://wafaabilal.com/and-counting/#&panel1-1
 http://wafaabilal.com/the-ashes-series/#&panel1-4
http://wafaabilal.com/the-ashes-series/#&panel1-4
 http://wafaabilal.com/the-ashes-series/#&panel1-4
http://wafaabilal.com/the-ashes-series/#&panel1-4

Appropriation

when-life-hands-you-lemons-blog

“When life gives you lemons”

I tried to make the pun, that can have so many answers, into a collage by taking it literally. I found the 5 pictures on google, changing them with the blur tool and changing the opacity of the layers. Here are the photos I used in my collage.

sipsmith-spanish-lemon-peel1280px-life_magazine_logo-svgrain_drops_texture_by_annamntgods-hand-reaching-out-diymid-com-pyarmj-clipartyckgqmmoi

Cory Arcangel

Cory Arcangel currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York while making making technology based art, mostly with video games and software. He employs the use of video games and different softwares by hacking, manipulating, and reconfiguring the technology in order to change the mean of simple objects to create digital art. Which connects to the appropriation topic we discussed in class because Arcangel is taking an object or image and covering the piece.  I found a lot of irony and symbolism to be present in his art that reference popular culture in western civilization, such as technology and video games.

My favorite piece of his work is the Photoshop Gradient Demonstration, because they are so simplistic but so beautiful. The variety of colors provided my the tool can give multiple meanings to different people and make them feel many different things, despite how simple the work is and I really like that. However many of his other works I have trouble connecting with because I am not personally attracted to video games and coding, but I respect how doing some editing to video games can give the piece a different feel and meaning, especially to those particularly attached to a certain game or those that are very iconic, like Mario. His digital works such as Asshole/Lakes and Video Painting I found very interesting because there can also be many different view points on the theme of these pieces, but the abstract and irony appeals to me most about his works.

http://www.coryarcangel.com/things-i-made/2014-095-hillary-lakes
http://www.coryarcangel.com/things-i-made/2014-095-hillary-lakes
http://www.coryarcangel.com/things-i-made/2005-001-super-mario-movie
http://www.coryarcangel.com/things-i-made/2005-001-super-mario-movie
http://www.coryarcangel.com/things-i-made/2014-080-photoshop-cs
http://www.coryarcangel.com/things-i-made/2014-080-photoshop-cs
http://www.coryarcangel.com/things-i-made/2008-002-video-painting
http://www.coryarcangel.com/things-i-made/2008-002-video-painting

One Tool

1-paint-ballerina-one-tool

“Dancing Art” – Paint tool

Represents how people focus on dance as an art form and not the hard work that ballerinas endure to make a performance a beautiful piece of art.

1-pitcher-one-tool

“Baby come back”-Clone tool

When the ball leaves the pitchers hand it is a make it or break it moment to see if it is a successful pitch or not, and sometimes they wish they could have a redo.

1-whale-one-tool

“Choppy waters”-Smudge tool

Whales have been in choppy waters by being hunted, especially in japan. This also represents how many people have distorted views on what is proper animal treatment in hunting.